Export from Sente to Scrivener
March 26, 2015

Using Notes from Sente

One of the biggest concerns I had about Sente was being able to use the notes that I had taken in Sente in a practical way. In using Word or Byword as the main writing tool for writing, this generally meant keeping Sente and the program open, with flicking back and forth between them. While I had identified a way to make this work, it was starting to get cumbersome, and unwieldy with long documents.

A number of people that do PhD research would be familiar with the Thesis Whisperer, and the program Scrivener that is often referred to on that blog. I have been trialling it, and finally bit the bullet and bought a copy. I’m still learning some of its peculiarities, however to get up and running with it and be functional from Day 1 is very straightforward.

I did still have this issue of flicking back and forward between Scrivener and Sente.

Fortunately a script has been developed to export notes from Sente to Scrivener, and there is a handy youtube video to quickly guide you through the script use.

Export from Sente to Scrivener

Worth checking out if you are looking at integrating a process for software that may not be as commonly used as Evernote. Sente is still my preferred PDF management app, and I’m glad that I’ve found ways to use that information from one program to another in a good flow with less repetition.

 

 

Sente on the iPad

I know that UOW and many other universities recommend Endnote as a bibliography and citation tool, however after careful consideration and running of the trial, I decided to invest in Sente. My reasons for this include:

  • It seems to do most (if not all) the things that Endnote can
  • It has an iPad app* that I can sync all my references (and articles)
  • The iPad app* allows for note taking while reading
  • It saves printing everything out and means that I can carry my entire reference database, including the articles, in my bag
  • It syncs everything – so it’s all backed up. At the moment I have it synced between my iMac (desktop), Macbook Air (laptop) and iPad. If one fails I can take a copy of the library from either of the other two sources and we are back in business
  • I can save a copy of the library file (with all the references and notations) to a hidden file storage section on this website
  • The ability to import references from Google Scholar, Amazon, or accept Endnote / BibTex reference files is a really good feature to avoid data entry errors when entering the references.Unfortunately at the moment it seems to be a reference manager for Mac OSX only… which is a bummer for windows users as it is really cool.

* The iPad app was the selling point for me.

Some screen shots are below. The software is available for trial and purchase from the Sente website.

Update: 27.Jul.2012
It seems I am not the only one that has been taken with Sente’s features, and someone else has summarised its selling points nicely:

“Then I found Sente. Here is what I love about it: 1) my reference library is much more searchable, 2) my library can be set to sync with senate’s server so I don’t even need to use my own server space, 3) can search and link PDFs much more efficiently from within Sente (check out “targeted browsing”), and the Big feature i love, 4) I can search my sente library, find and download new refs from my iPad, or from any other computer. If I annotate an article on my iPad or home computer, they are instantly synced to sente’s server, and are automatically updated on my work computer. This was a game changer for me. “
Source: Sente & Endnote – Forum Question

Price when I purchased this software (USD):
– Sente for Mac, Academic Discount ($89.95)
– Sente Reference Manager for iPad ($19.99)

Updated: 4.Nov.2013

The Sente for iPad app has been updated which allows for greater mobility in terms of importing PDFs directly on the iPad. This was previously more cumbersome. As I tend to download multiple references from my university library, import all at once and then sync to my ipad, this is less of an issue for me. It depends on your personal workflow.

It may be a little pricey, however in terms of portability and ease of use, in my opinion it’s been worth it.

Updated: 2.May.2014

I have looked at a number of alternatives for other people who cannot use Sente as they have to survive on Windows. My conclusion is… I feel very sorry for them. :(

Sente rocks! :)

Sente on the Mac

Sente on the Mac

 

Sente on the iPad

Sente on the iPad